Tag Archives: Sheet Mulch

Moonlight Hunt

October 31, 2016

While cleaning up after sheet mulching under the grape trellis, I noticed the box cutter was missing. Yikes! The blade on that tool was open. I looked everywhere I could think of, then, I looked back at the six-inch thick layer of chips on top of overlapped bike boxes. Hmmm … under there somewhere?

Many people were coming to the orchard soon, including kids. I visualized some child finding the box cutter. I knew I had better make an effort to find it.

I asked Aurora Rents about renting a metal detector but the representative was hesitant since the lost tool was close to a metal fence. I needed advice from the pros.

I left a message with Mark Kulseth, president of Cascade Treasure Club, the local metal detecting metal detector sm WP_20161028_004and treasure hunting organization. I asked him about the different types of metal detectors, thinking that I might buy one and then donate it to the Tool Library (so other gardeners could find those precious pruners buried somewhere in their garden.)

Mark emailed some general information about metal detectors and wrote that he would stop by the next time he was in Seattle. Wow!

All metal detectors will detect underneath the coil but when they get to close to large metal items, such as our chain link fence, there will be interference. With a small diameter coil (3″), it might be possible to detect the object.

He advised me to purchase a Garrett metal detector at KellyCo. An entry-level machine like the Ace-250 would do but it does not come with a small coil. Small coils are after market accessories.

Mark and a friend pulled up to the orchard on Friday and took a few tools out of his truck. He explained that, being near a fence, the best procedure is to use sweeping motions, from the fence inward, listening for an extra tone to indicate more metal than just the fence.

As we walked to the spot where I was sure I had lost the tool, he told me a story of a woman who was positive she lost her beloved engagement ring within a certain two-block area. Mark hunted with patience but came up empty handed. She called him a week later to say she found the ring in a sack of potatoes on her back porch.

Of course, I was thinking, “What if my tool is not where I have asked him to look! I don’t know where the stupid tool is. What a potential waste of his time!”

Sun, Nov 20, 2-4, Work Party
Sun, Dec 18, 2-4, Work Party

Mark turned on his detector in the grape chips and in six seconds he pulled up the box cutter! Easy peasy for a pro. It had not even rusted yet … still perfectly useful.

I was thrilled and he was glad to get on his way. He said he had plenty to do to get ready for the club’s annual Moonlight Hunt, where they all go out with no flashlights and search for coins that are painted black. One of the coins will have a code and the finder will earn a nice new metal detector.

I should show up at this event and just paw around on my hands and knees to search for that special coin!

Ruth

This is a re-post since WordPress ap Jetpack failed to notify subscribers of original post Oct 28.

Moonlight Hunt

October 28, 2016

While cleaning up after sheet mulching under the grape trellis, I noticed the box cutter was missing. Yikes! The blade on that tool was open. I looked everywhere I could think of, then, I looked back at the six-inch thick layer of chips on top of overlapped bike boxes. Hmmm … under there somewhere?

Many people were coming to the orchard soon, including kids. I visualized some child finding the box cutter. I knew I had better make an effort to find it.

I asked Aurora Rents about renting a metal detector but the representative was hesitant since the lost tool was close to a metal fence. I needed advice from the pros.

I left a message with Mark Kulseth, president of Cascade Treasure Club, the local metal detecting metal detector sm WP_20161028_004and treasure hunting organization. I asked him about the different types of metal detectors, thinking that I might buy one and then donate it to the Tool Library (so other gardeners could find those precious pruners buried somewhere in their garden.)

Mark emailed some general information about metal detectors and wrote that he would stop by the next time he was in Seattle. Wow!

All metal detectors will detect underneath the coil but when they get to close to large metal items, such as our chain link fence, there will be interference. With a small diameter coil (3″), it might be possible to detect the object.

He advised me to purchase a Garrett metal detector at KellyCo. An entry-level machine like the Ace-250 would do but it does not come with a small coil. Small coils are after market accessories.

Mark and a friend pulled up to the orchard on Friday and took a few tools out of his truck. He explained that, being near a fence, the best procedure is to use sweeping motions, from the fence inward, listening for an extra tone to indicate more metal than just the fence.

As we walked to the spot where I was sure I had lost the tool, he told me a story of a woman who was positive she lost her beloved engagement ring within a certain two-block area. Mark hunted with patience but came up empty handed. She called him a week later to say she found the ring in a sack of potatoes on her back porch.

Of course, I was thinking, “What if my tool is not where I have asked him to look! I don’t know where the stupid tool is. What a potential waste of his time!”

Sun, Nov 20, 2-4, Work Party
Sun, Dec 18, 2-4, Work Party

Mark turned on his detector in the grape chips and in six seconds he pulled up the box cutter! Easy peasy for a pro. It had not even rusted yet … still perfectly useful.

I was thrilled and he was glad to get on his way. He said he had plenty to do to get ready for the club’s annual Moonlight Hunt, where they all go out with no flashlights and search for coins that are painted black. One of the coins will have a code and the finder will earn a nice new metal detector.

I should show up at this event and just paw around on my hands and knees to search for that special coin!

Ruth

Day of Dragonflies

July 7, 2013

Today, I was thigh deep in Green Lake, helping Friends of Green Lake (FOGL) haul Eurasian Watermilfoil out of the water. (Eurasian milfoil is an invasive non-native plant.)

Dragonflies were everywhere and some were quite large, though not as big as this one pictured Dragonflieshere from Butchart Gardens. (Possible sound wall art?) The dragonflies were landing on the mat of milfoil, downed tree branches and blue-green algae. I was removing some of their perch. Speaking of perch, I freed one fish that was tangled in both milfoil and knotted fish line – yet another reason for milfoil removal.

Watermilfoil is excellent compost (http://www.apms.org/japm/vol16/v16p24.pdf) so Nancy took five bike trailer loads to the orchard. The material will work well under the cardboard, especially since leaves are scarce at this time of year. I spoke with several people who were walking the lake and one man said that milfoil washes up to the upper east corner of Lake Washington, near where he lives. He said he has hauled milfoil to his garden and he noted that it took about a year to break down.

Save The Dates
1st Public design meeting Aug 18. 2nd meeting Sep 28 – Both at the Orchard.

Today at the lake, I also heard a loud commanding boot camp instructor. Hmm… I said to myself, I know a good boot camp class that is free: our next sheet mulch party, Sunday, July 14, 2-4 pm! (All are welcome and only one job requires brute strength.)

Other important news: Thanks to the hiring committee of Justin, Nancy and Pam, we hired Barker & Associates as our Landscape Architects (LA) for the upcoming Orchard community design process. Jackie Cramer will be on the team as the permaculture expert.

We can sure use more helpers, especially for Nancy, who is in charge of hosting the three public meetings at which the community design process will unfold. Please give us a call or send an email. Also, keep your eye on the calendar page of this website.

Thank you to Aaron for designing our brochure and 062113 Aaron's Heart smadopting Alex’s three tree circles (photo at right). Thank you to Melany for providing professional signs for the trees! Thank you to Justin, Nancy, Joan, Jennifer & Marcus, Max and Dana for their excellent sheet mulching Sunday, June 30.

063013 work party crew sm JH

Finally, there is interest in hosting Seattle Night Out (Against Crime), at the Orchard, Tuesday evening August 6. We love the idea but many of us are busy with the Neighborhood Matching Grant responsibilities. Please speak up if you are willing to help coordinate. A volunteer who will organize entertainment has already stepped forward.

Ruth