Category Archives: Uncategorized

FECO’s 10th Annual Cider Fest – en vivo! A COVID-unfriendly event

October 8, 2020

Friends! This year’s Fest will be the best ever. Bring your raincoat, join us Saturday¬† from 2-4pm, and enjoy the lineup:

Saturday, Oct. 10, 2-4pm
6th Ave NE, just south of NE 63rd St
rain or shine
freewayestatescommunityorchard@gmail.com
check calendar for details

Three fabulous young musicians

The best assortment of homemade pie slices, scrumptous homemade granola, raspberry jam, and
invigorating homemade salsa verde

Plants for sale include natives, strawberries, and a few fig and elderberry plants

Miscellaneous art items

The kids will be busy filling out their passports.

OH! and free warm cider from the press!

Quite different from prior years, the Fest is designed as a tour. The anti-Covid team marked a one-way loop route through the orchard and native areas. Distancing and masks are required.

For those who don’t like rain (maybe you just moved to Seattle) we have runners who will greet guests with a handout of all sale items and prices. If lighting strikes your car, you don’t even have to get out!

There are quizzes and interpretive signs along the loop. Everyone will learn something new about gardening.

This is our annual fundraiser. Please bring cash or your checkbook. Volunteers have spent so many hours tidying up. We are very proud of what we have accomplished this year. See you soon!

Ruth

World Premiere Video – about FECO!

September 21, 2020

FECO World Premiere! Welcome to Freeway Estates Community Orchard

Here it is friends – a video about us! We commissioned a very talented and patient producer/videographer, Carter Raaen, and we were privileged to catch the following interview with him.

FECO: Did you watch movies/videos when you were younger?
Carter: Yeah. I have been watching movies all my life, especially Disney movies, kids movies. Now, I watch a movie every day.

FECO: A favorite Disney movie?
Carter: The 1991 version of Beauty and the Beast. The songs, the characters, and the story … everything was real good. There been sequels and a remake but I prefer the original.

FECO: What happened that made you want to make videos?
Carter: In 6th grade, I played video games, especially Minecraft. Friends were making videos of themselves building things with Minecraft and I started doing the same. We didn’t need any editing equipment, just our smart phones. I also started a YouTube channel. Making videos helped me appreciate movies and the behind the scenes work. When I started making videos where some editing was needed, I just used some screen recording software.

When I was a sophomore in high school, I took a photography class that taught me the basics. I learned some basics from my father; he had older cameras. I also took a film class that year and we made short videos in groups. My junior year I took a film class as well.

FECO: Do you have all of the equipment that you need?
Carter: I don’t have a videographer camera because they are too pricey … probably $2,500 or so. However, it is an inspiration to know that Shawn Baker and Steven Soderbergh just use their smart phones.

FECO: What obstacles did you face, at the beginning, or now?
Carter: Yeah. As I have done more research, I find you can get more phone accessories, but they are also expensive.

FECO: Did making our video give you any insights or new skills?
Carter: I got an app called Filmic Pro that allows me to make adjustments like I can with a real camera (shutter speed, ISO, etc.). Smart cameras don’t let you do that. So that was a new application for me. The other new thing was … I had never worked with a group other than my friends.

Volunteers are needed!
by appointment
please email freewayestatescommunityorchard@gmail.com
10th Annual Cider Fest!
Sat Oct 10, 2-4pm
check calendar for details

FECO: Is there a videographer network group for you in Seattle?
Carter: I don’t belong to any professional group. I do have a group of friends to make videos with. Most are the same people I made videos with as a sophomore in high school.

FECO: What is your ultimate goal with video making?
Carter: Not sure. I may get an undergraduate degree in Cinema & Media Studies. At any rate, I will be taking film classes at the UW. Maybe Hollywood, but it’s real competitive.

FECO: Is there anything else about videography that you think would be interesting to people outside “the know”?
Carter: A smart phone is a great way to start. It’s not nearly as hard as it used to be to make a film.

Thank you Carter.

Carter’s YouTube channel is www.youtube.com/nilmersteve
There, you can find his reviews of his favorite 46 animated films produced by Disney Studios.

Here’s an excerpt from his review of Beauty and The Beast:
” … Every song slaps in terms of purpose and Gaston as a hilarious villain and Belle is a great antagonist. The romance alone is super compelling and makes the average Disney love story look embarrassing …

Ruth

LINK TO THE FECO VIDEO

 

The Tyranny of the Harvest – Looking for Honeycrisp Lovers

August 29, 2020

You can watch summer squash grow. Just have a seat. The plant explodes with six at once. You are hurriedly trying to remember who likes squash, before the fruits look like footballs.

“Would you like to take a yellow squash?”, I asked a volunteer at the end of his shift.
“Oh no, I grow squash.” Then, he offers back, “Would you like some zucchini?”

Next, I look at a green bean, short and lean. I thought I had time before I had to pick. The very next day they ballooned. The gold rush is on. Now I must pick ever other day.

Then come the tomatillos, and then the elderberry – more goodies for volunteers.

The William’s Pride apples ripened a bit early this year, but the winter moth caterpillars thwarted most blooms. A small harvest but volunteers always appreciate apples.

 

This one’s for you. Let it sit four days.
For you these should chill in the refer, then two days on the table.
Iodine, thumb press, tacky peel … there are so many ways
I try to time perfect maturity, as much as I’m able.

The Honeycrisp apple tree was largely unaffected by the winter moth caterpillars. It is loaded. I thinned at least 190 apples from the tree. A few weeks later, I asked Dane, a young helper, to thin again in the classic way: one apple per 6 inches of space. I turned my head and handed him the pruners. Still, even with this final thinning, it will be a challenge to get them all distributed.

Volunteers are needed!
by appointment
please email
freewayestatescommunityorchard@gmail.com

Wednesday, I asked Sue if she had a Tyranny of the Harvest story. “Sure.” she said.
(Note: Sue is infatuated with growing tomatoes, in spite of our wimpy summers. Story is a bit edited.)

When I managed the Adult Learning Garden at Seattle Tilth (now Tilth Alliance), each year I would wait until October to take my summer vacation then drive to Colorado and New Mexico to visit family. I packed the trunk with boxes of green tomatoes. They sat in the back, baking in the sun, and they ripen at different speeds. Our aim way to share with everyone we visited along the way.

 

Last year, we left a cousin in Salt Lake City
And were near to our friend in Grand Junction
Bad timing; no additional ripe tomatoes. What a pity!
We had to skip that visit, with some compunction.
In the end, we met our goal: to use all of them, have none rot,
before we got to our last stop.

Go Sue!

Today, as I was leaving the orchard, I walked past the Honeycrisp. Dare I look? I glanced up and I saw an apple with those streaking red vertical lines – big, with good color. Oh my, nearly ripe.

Friends of FECO! We invite you to make a $20.00 donation for 5 pounds of organic Honeycrisp (average retail price in Washington State.)
You will need to let us know right away! You can order more than 5 pounds.
(We are out of money and we still have supplies to purchase this year.) Thank you.

freewayestatescommunityorchard@gmail.com

Ruth