Tag Archives: food bank

Offerings

July 26, 2019

Whatever we offer to the community, a larger offering comes back, in one way or another.

Yesterday morning a teen was sitting cross-legged on the bench, reading a book. She stayed quite awhile. The bench is a small offering to those passing by.

But a much more significant offering this year was from you and your friends and family. You did it! You surpassed our fund raising goal of $600 by $135. The timing could not be better since we just incurred an unbudgeted cost to fix the website.

We also received $300, to date, for our spigot replacement fund, a separate capital cost that four other volunteers offered to help with. We don’t know the plumbing cost yet but we’ll try one spigot, of a different type, to see if it survives vandalism and theft. Cross your fingers.

Sat, Aug 3, 10-12, Work Party
Sun, Aug 18, 2-4, Work Party
Sat, Sep 7, 10-12, Work Party
Sun, Sep 15, 2-4, Work Party

Meanwhile, Sue and I are also ecstatic about recent volunteer offerings!

Spring helpers were redirected toward squishing larvae. One volunteer grumbled that squishing was not on the to-do list and another couldn’t face the task without tweezers. However, most were mildly enthusiastic and their hard work paid off. Even though the crop on the Liberty and the William’s Pride are only 1/10 of their normal yield, we would not have any apples without that early attention to those blossoms.

Allison, a weekly volunteer, has a keen sense for detail, a good pair of eyes and an ease for fruit and nut tree work. I am lucky to have her help.

Thank you to newcomers Nicole, Amy, Maxwell, Matt, Eric, Daniel, Emily, Jeremy, Reid, Ryan, Sarah, Micah and Hannah. Signs of their work are everywhere. Last Thursday, after harvest, Sue looked at me and said she was going home early for the first time! (She looked a bit confused but I peeked down the sidewalk and, in fact, she was headed in the right direction.)

University Y volunteers, Andy and Sandra offered mulching and gravel reclamation services. We are thankful for their partnership.

The offering from LaFawnda’s KidsCo troop is always commendable. The kids march down NE 60th St each month to help with construction and watering, and then make sure no mulberry goes to waste.

I am especially grateful to the veteran volunteers who stick with us year after year: Sue, Nancy, Jennifer, Kate, Nora, Joan, Arly, Brannon, Max, Maya, Ken, Michelle, Meg, Renee, Melody and Jeff.

Last night a man strolled to the herb spiral, pulled out a pair of scissors and carefully nipped a few herbs. He then walked by me with his bouquet in his hand and nodded, “Thanks for the offering.”

We are honored by the commitment of the community to Freeway Estates and we will continue to be a peaceful refuge with abundant offerings of food, education, and personal connections.

Ruth

New Watering System Is On Tap

October 1, 2017

It’s fascinating how one mulberry or one thornless blackberry can sustain me while I work in the sm-persimmon-wp_20171001_002orchard. Just that brief sweet juicy explosion can satisfy, nourish and make me smile. These two fruits are new to the orchard and they have proved their worth.

It will be several weeks before we know whether the new persimmons will mature or not but otherwise, we are nearly finished with the harvest.

We have donated an estimated 244 pounds to the food bank. Now, however, the sun weakens and plant production is slowing.

sm-reseeded-lettuce-wp_20170928_001The transition to fall plants such as radish, lettuce, cilantro, mustards, arugula and various cover crops has begun. Check out that germination rate of lettuce that Sue let go to seed! It looks like carpet. Thinning could be a challenge.

We ended up with tasty samples of all apple and pear varieties, even though the winter moth larvae took out many of the blossoms last spring. The good ole Liberty was the best performer and we have enough Liberty to reward the Cider Fest volunteers this coming Saturday.

The dry summer taxed every plant. Our aim is to water just enough to keep the fruit and nut trees in good health. I believe that they got enough water but next year’s crop will tell the tale. We do think the berries and grapes were under watered.

Sat, Oct 7, 2-5, Cider Fest!
Apple contributions are welcome! We have science exhibits for the kids. Cider and pie slices.
Sun, Oct 15, 2-4, Work Party

Sun, Nov 19, 2-4, Work Party
Sun, Dec 17, 2-4, Work Party

In the interest of saving water, saving time watering, and allowing watering to be physically easy, we have applied for another Seattle Dept of Neighborhood matching grant. It’s a small grant, about $10,000, but should be enough to buy a manual pump, ollas, some vertical perforated pipe and low-pressure, gravity fed drip irrigation materials. We also are beneficiaries of a used 1,000-gallon cistern, which could be enough assistance to free us from using city water.

We are in need of a mechanical or civil engineer to help us with choice of pump to carry water from shows-hose-in-and-hose-out-treadle-pump-1the cisterns out to the beds. Choosing the right pump will be critical to the efficacy of the whole irrigation system to the food bank beds. Contact us if that engineer is you or your friend!

Please join us for our annual celebration next Saturday between 2-5pm, rain or shine.

Ruth

The Case of the Knife in the Watermelon

August 6, 2017

Well, no. Actually, the case of the missing spaghetti squash.

Laura and Mitch, new gardeners in the orchard, plopped in some squash starts Memorial Day 170802-spaghetti-squash-wp_20170802_004weekend and by the end of July their garden bed was busting with yellow footballs. We were all under the assumption that they planted summer squash. (Winter squash is tricky west of the mountains and usually takes 90 to 135 days to mature.

We were afraid they forgot to harvest so I sent an email letting them know they might want to pick when the squash was small, about six inches, for the finest quality.

A few days later, I discovered seven yellow squash were on the ground, lined up along the path.

Wed, Aug 16, 5-8, Special Work Party – Make Food Bank Bed
Sun, Aug 20, 2-4, Work Party
Sat, Sep 2, 10-12, Work Party
Sat, Sep 16, 10-11, Intro to Qigong

I scratched my head and decided Laura had taken us up on our offer to include them in the next load for the food bank. I carted them home for safekeeping so the rats wouldn’t take notice.

The next day Laura stopped at the orchard and began looking for her squash. She had her phone handy so she dialed Encyclopedia Brown. “Brown,” she started, “We have a mystery here. I didn’t have room in my backpack yesterday for all these heavy squash and now they have disappeared.”

Brown solved the mystery within two minutes. “Laura, what has happened here is that the older gardeners here think they know everything. They didn’t bother looking at the plant tag in your bed that clearly noted these are spaghetti squash. Indeed, they should be picked when they are the size of a football. You need to call Callard and demand your squash be returned.”

We were humbled. Laura and Mitch had pulled out a dozen spaghetti squash before the end of July! That is truly a gardening success. The rest of us will be paying more attention to the moves these newcomers make.

food-bank-haul-sm-wp_20170803_001Please consider joining us Wednesday evening, August 16, as we make another food bank bed. Thanks to Sue for last week’s harvest (see photo).

Ruth